Bibliography Entry

Gray, J., Bounegru, L., Milan, S., & Ciuccarelli, P. (2016). Ways of Seeing Data: Toward a Critical Literacy for Data Visualizations as Research Objects and Research Devices. In Innovative Methods in Media and Communication Research (pp. 227-251). Springer International Publishing. 

Gray, Bounegru, Milan, Ciuccarelli argue for a reflection on visual rhetoric methodology. They propose a heuristic framework of reflection drawing upon the following: new media studies, science and technology studies, the history and philosophy of science, and cultural studies and critical theory.

Lohse, J., Rueter, H., Biolsi, K., & Walker, N. (1990, October). Classifying visual knowledge representations: A foundation for visualization research. In Visualization, 1990. Visualization’90., Proceedings of the First IEEE Conference on (pp. 131-138). IEEE. 

This piece proved to be a useful addition to Drucker’s Graphesis. Classifying research visualizations as graphs and tables, maps, diagrams, networks, and icons, the authors note that spatial information and cognitive processing effort differentiate the “homogenous clusters,” or the classifications of visual representations in research.

Van Leeuwen, T. (2006). Towards a semiotics of typography. Information design journal, 14(2), 139-155. 

I based my poster off of Van Leeuwen’s piece on typography. Van Leeuwen argues that typography is no longer “a craft of the written word,” but a visual rhetoric in itself. He provides a classification system and ways in which to interpret its characteristics.

Hocks, M. E. (2003). Understanding visual rhetoric in digital writing environments. College composition and communication, 629-656. 

Hocks comments on the importance of an awareness of visual rhetoric when teaching composition, but most notably, in “digital writing environments.” Hocks emphasizes the visual representation of text on the internet, and how understanding audience stance, transparency, and hibridity can help writers and students channel visual rhetoric principles when forming online documentation.

Brumberger, E. R. (2005). Visual rhetoric in the curriculum: Pedagogy for a multimodal workplace. Business Communication Quarterly, 68(3), 318-333.

Brumberger comments on the lack of visual rhetoric training in business courses. By lacking visual rhetoric education, students (as professionals) are unable to utilize and mediate multimodal environments. Brumberger suggests adding courses, integrating visual communications, and contextualizing (in business settings) existing design projects to improve on this issue.

Brooke Notes: Welcome to Pine Point

Citation

Shoebridge, P., & Simons, M. (2011). Welcome to Pine Point. NFB Interactive.

 

Keywords

Interactive PDF, memory, multimodality, Pine Point, community.

 

Summary

Shoebridge and Simons document the life and death of Pine Point: a small mining town in Canada’s North Territories that was demolished shortly after the mine closed in 1987. Going through various townspeople recollections, the authors explore several themes: the enigma of human memory, nostalgia, insiders and outsiders, and physicality and mentality.

 

Quotes

“Memory is funny. Specific and vague. Visceral and unreliable. Truth, and fiction.”

“From the moment an event occurs, it is simplified and purified in memory. We shave off the rough edges and what happened becomes a story or even, over time, a legend. It we’re not careful, though, we grind it down to raw superlatives, with none of the banalities or complications that make truth feel true. So often a memory depends on who we need to be at the moment of remembrance. Sometimes it’s better to believe that we accomplished the impossible.”

“Who can relate to an entire town closing except people whose town has closed?”

 

Question

Throughout the piece, the authors speculate on the ways memory is or is not accurate. In some cases, they question its accuracy. For example, the town bully: he remembers himself as being an undefeated champion in a sport, while the authors speculatively present his memory. On the other hand, they claim that the Pine Pointers’ memories are untouched because the town’s original infrastructure was untouched (or never developed–no Arby’s), their “recollection will always be the most accurate version of that place and time.”

So what are things that cloud memory? Is it clouding, or is Truth so inaccessible, especially reflectively, that memory is truth? Can truth and memory even be compared?

Reading Questions: 2/6

“By focusing on the human shaping of material, and on the ties of material to human practices, we might be in better positions to ask after the consequences not only of how we use water but also of how we use paper, ink, and pixels to shape—for better or worse—the actions of others.” (Wysocki 59)

 (Barry 180)

Wysocki discusses the ways in which humans shape materials, and how we are often confined by the cultural implications of certain technologies. Barry, on the other hand, often discusses how materials and words shape us, and she gives several examples of poems, images, and colors that create and shape our memories and dreams.

Where, then, is the true intersection of modality, materiality, and our own imagination? Do the materials we use shape us? Or do we shape the modes and materials we use? [LW]

Bibliography – 1/23

Gries, L. (2015). Still life with rhetoric: A new materialist approach for visual rhetorics. University Press of Colorado.

I found this book by using Google Scholar to search for works that cite Barthe’s Camera Lucida. In this book, Gries uses the Obama Hope image to study how images circulate and inspire others to create similar images or works within other genres. [HD]

Kress, G., & Van Leeuwen, T. (2006). Reading images: The grammar of visual design (2nd ed.). New York, NY: Routledge.

I found this book by using Google Scholar to search for works that cite Barthe’s Camera Lucida. The authors include a wide-range of discussions about visual communication, with examples of children’s drawings, school textbook illustrations, advertisements, scientific diagrams, and three-dimensional structures (sculptures, toys, architecture, etc.). Through these mediums, they examine how images communicate meaning. [HD]

Murray, J. (2010). Non-discursive rhetoric: Image and affect in multimodal composition. SUNY Press.

I found this book by using Google Scholar to search for works that cite Sontag’s On Photography. Murray draws from philosophy, rhetorical theory, and neuroscience to develop his own model of composing, which brings together writing, technology and the ways our minds process images. Within the book, he details ways writing teachers can help their students create multimodal texts. [HD]

Rettberg, J. W. (2014). Seeing ourselves through technology: How we use selfies, blogs and wearable devices to see and shape ourselves. United Kingdom: Palgrave Macmillan.

I found this book by using Google Scholar to search for works that cite Barthe’s Camera Lucida. The book was written by Jill Rettberg, a professor of Digital Culture at the University of Bergen in Norway. This open access book explores how we use technologies, selfies, blogs, and other devices to help us understand ourselves in a society where our machines sometimes rule who we are. [HD]

Rose, G. (2016). Visual methodologies: An introduction to researching with visual materials (4th ed.). SAGE.

I found this book by using Google Scholar to search for works that cite Barthe’s Camera Lucida. This is a bestselling guide about visual culture and analyzing and interpreting various forms of visual content. The fourth edition is up-to-date to include discussions of social media and new technologies. Other areas of interest within the book include a chapter about how to use the book, chapters on discourse analysis, and discussions about research methods. [HD]