Bibliography 2/6

Ball, C. E. (2012). Assessing Scholarly Multimedia: A Rhetorical Genre Studies Approach. Technical Communication Quarterly,21(1), 61-77. doi:10.1080/10572252.2012.626390

This article was found while looking for works that cite Anne Wysocki’s “Awaywithwords.” The article focuses on a teacher’s methods of using multimedia in assignments for her writing class. The author also gives criteria for how these projects should be assessed.

Brunetti, I. (2011). Cartooning: philosophy and practice. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press.

This book is cited in Lynda Barry’s Syllabus. She uses Brunetti’s practices in the classroom and assigns this text for her class to read. This text presents itself as a guide to cartoon making and storytelling, giving exercises and assignments.

Groppel-Wegener, A. (2016). Groppel-Wegener Writing Essays by Pictures – Redrawing the textbook. Journal of Pedagogic Development, 6(3), 65-69. Retrieved February 5, 2017, from https://journals.beds.ac.uk/ojs/index.php/jpd/article/view/351/526.

This source was found while looking for works that cite Lynda Barry’s Syllabus on Google Scholar. The article examines the textbook as an academic genre, which is argued to be “outmoded”. It suggests that learning resources should go beyond just the textbook and expresses the importance of image use in communication.

Mendonça, P. (2016). Graphic facilitation, sketchnoting, journalism and ‘The Doodle Revolution’: New dimensions in comics scholarship. Studies in Comics,7(1), 127-152. doi:10.1386/stic.7.1.127_1

This source was found while looking for works that cite Lynda Barry’s Syllabus on Google Scholar. Mendonca discusses the effect of words and images combine to, “represent the content  of an event, discussion or process.”  The article explains that drawing is crucial for understanding, even if it is considered poor. Noted that this method is used in the professional field but should be pushed in communities and organizations.

Newcomb, M. (2012). Sustainability as a Design Principle for Composition: Situational Creativity as a Habit of Mind. College Composition and Communication,63(4), 593-615. Retrieved February 5, 2017, from http://www.jstor.org/stable/23264230?seq=1#page_scan_tab_contents

This article was found while looking for works that cite Anne Wysocki’s “Awaywithwords.” Newcomb argues that “Design is a rhetorical activity that requires creative thinking in response to difficult situations.” He explains that sustainable design can be a tool for writing that changes the way people think while writing and promotes creativity.

Bibliography Entries – 2/6

Kress, G. (2005). Gains and losses: New forms of texts, knowledge, and learning. Computers and Composition, 22(1), 5-22. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.compcom.2004.12.004

This source, which is the primary text that Wysocki is responding to, is accessible through Google Scholar. Kress explores what can be gained (affordances) and lost when we shift communicative representation away from writing, and toward materiality, images, digital media, and other non-traditional forms of communication. He also discusses how these shifts toward design can impact learning, forms of reading, knowledge, and human agency. [NW]

 

Saenger, P. (1997). Space between words: The origins of silent reading. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press.

This book, which Wysocki references in her discussion of space, is accessible through Google Books. Saenger documents the history and process of how reading–which was originally an oral activity–has become a silent activity due to writing and the written space between words. The space on pages (which makes reading a silent activity) originates from and continues to shape how we comprehend words and reading. [NW]

 

New London Group. (1996). A pedagogy of multiliteracies: Designing social futures. Harvard Educational Review, 66(1), 60-92. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.17763/haer.66.1.17370n67v22j160u

This article, which I’ve heard framed as a foundational text for multimodality (and has been cited in several of our readings already), is accessible through Google Scholar. The New London Group argue that we need a broader understanding of literacy–one that encompasses the multiple communication channels students use daily. They argue that embracing a multiliteracy / multimodal pedagogy can empower students to design and shape their social futures.  [NW]

 

Ball, C. (2012). Assessing scholarly multimedia: A rhetorical genre studies approach. Technical Communication Quarterly, 21(1), 61-77. Doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10572252.2012.626390

Per our conversation about assessing visual texts, this article, which is accessible through Cheryl Ball’s website, might be helpful. Ball outlines what scholarly multimedia texts are–what they look like–and recommends that teachers invite their students to help generate assessment criteria with which their work can be assessed. She also argues that when assessing multimedia work, the content and form cannot be separated from the text’s rhetorical purpose. [NW]

 

Norman, D. Affordances and design. Retrieved from http://www.jnd.org/dn.mss/affordances_and.html

This source, which was listed in Wysocki’s works cited page, explores Norman’s concept of affordance. He explains that the term affordance has gained traction with design work, but the concept of perceived affordance raises important questions about physical and cultural constraints. Norman also argues that we can be well served by thinking about affordances relationships between various design elements/stakeholders. [NW]

Bibliography – 1/30

Brooks, K. (2009). More “seriously visible” reading: McCloud, McLuhan, and the visual language of the medium is the massage. College Composition and Communication, 61(1), W217-W237. Retrieved from http://ezproxy.emich.edu/login?url=http://search.proquest.com/docview/220709417?accountid=10650

Brook’s piece, which I found while using the Halle Library database to search for works that cited Diana George’s “From Analysis to Design: Visual Communication in the Teaching of Writing,” provides an analysis of Quentin Fiore’s visual-verbal text The Medium Is the Massage. Brook’s argues that the field of composition studies would benefit from more sustained and sophisticated readings of visual-verbal academic texts even as the field shifts from analysis to design. Brook’s names Diana George as one who helped outline the shift from analysis to design when it comes to teaching visual communication [RN-J].

Bunn, M. (2011). Visual Rhetoric in Composition Courses: Adopting an Approach that Helps Students Produce Their Own Visual Discourse. Reader: essays in reader-oriented theory, criticism, and pedagogy, (61), 87-103. Retrieved from http://literature.proquest.com.ezproxy.emich.edu/searchFulltext.do?id=R04649413&divLevel=0&trailId=1595202207A&area=criticism&forward=critref_ft&browse=true

Bunn’s piece, which I found while using the Halle Library database to search for works that cited Diana George’s “From Analysis to Design: Visual Communication in the Teaching of Writing,” addresses ways of teaching visual rhetoric in composition that deal with reception (something they “read”) rather than production (something they “write”). His article explores the concept of visual rhetoric in order to provide a sense of how visual rhetoric might be defined and taught in college composition courses to help students make important connections between the visual texts they are reading and their own efforts to produce visual texts [RN-J].

Lazaroff, R. (2008). Picturing composition: Snapshot photography and the writing classroom. Retrieved from http://ezproxy.emich.edu/login?url=http://search.proquest.com/docview/304671448?accountid=10650

Lazaroff’s Dissertation, which I found while using the Halle Library database to search for works that cited Diana George’s “From Analysis to Design: Visual Communication in the Teaching of Writing,” studied what happens when students in an English Composition course use their own photographs and picture-taking experiences to inform their own writing. He examines the creation of a student-centered classroom and the pedagogy that supports the assigning of projects in a composition class that combine students’ own photographs and picture-taking experiences [RN-J].

Marback, R. (2009). Embracing wicked problems: The turn to design in composition studies. College Composition and Communication, 61(2), 23. Retrieved from http://ezproxy.emich.edu/login url=http://search.proquest.com/docview/61819259?accountid=10650

Marback’s piece, which I found while using the Halle Library database to search for works that cited Diana George’s “From Analysis to Design: Visual Communication in the Teaching of Writing,” makes a case for the advantages of understanding of design as a matter of resolving wicked problems. He points to Diana George’s article as having begun the project of rearticulating composition studies around issues of student production as design [RN-J].

Odell, L., & Katz, S. M. (2009). “Yes, a T-shirt!”: Assessing visual composition in the “writing” class. College Composition and Communication, 61(1), 20. Retrieved from http://ezproxy.emich.edu/login?url=http://search.proquest.com/docview/61843250?accountid=10650

Odell and Katz’s piece, which I found while using the Halle Library database to search for works that cited Diana George’s “From Analysis to Design: Visual Communication in the Teaching of Writing,” explores how to assess student work with visuals without losing sight of conventional goals of a “writing” course. They illustrate this approach with an analysis of an unconventional student text-a T-shirt-that students submitted as the final assignment for a relatively conventional writing course [RN-J].

Bibliography 1/29

Boschee, J. (2016). Language, identity, and relations: We Gaze as visual-literacy and arts-based inquiry in teaching (Master’s thesis). Retrieved from https://www.uleth.ca/dspace/bitstream/handle/10133/4522/Boschee%2c%20Jana.pdf?sequence=1&isAllowed=y

During my search through Google Scholar, I found Jana Boschee’s MA thesis that cites Lynda Barry’s Syllabus. In this multi-modal work, Boschee explores the role of identity within the creation of artful text. She also investigates and explains the purpose of We Gaze, a social fiction created by the author. In We Gaze, the author and her cohort investigate pedagogy from within narratives produced by those teaching during this project. [MAP]

Causey, A. (2017). Drawn to see: Using line drawing as an ethnographic method. Toronto, ON: University of Toronto Press.

Causey’s book, which I found on Google Scholar during my search for works that cite Barry’s Syllabus, discusses the value behind utilizing drawing as a way to re-see reality. Causey provides readers with a sort of “How-to” regarding mindfully seeing and interacting with the world at large through drawing. [MAP]

Groppel-Wegener, A. (2016). Writing essays by pictures: Redrawing the textbook. Journal of Pedagogic Development, 6(3), 65-69. Retrieved from https://journals.beds.ac.uk/ojs/index.php/jpd/article/view/351/526

This article, which I also found through Google Scholar, discusses revisiting textbooks to decide if textbooks need to be revamped, in general. The article explores the concept of textbooks as a genre and proposes a new approach to textbooks, one that questions the design aspects. [MAP]

Shipka, J. (2005). A multimodal task-based framework for composing. College Composition and Communication, 57(2), 277-306. Retrieved from http://www.jstor.org/stable/30037916

Shipka’s piece, which I found through Halle Library’s database, explores the idea of expanding the reaches of composition studies beyond just written texts. Shipka advocates for this inclusive approach to writing and suggests the writing process should include consideration of the influence of the tools used during the process, as well as everything within the environment surrounding the writer during the writing process. [MAP]

Tolmie, J (Ed.). (2013). Drawing from life: Memory and subjectivity in comic art. Jackson, MS: University Press of Mississippi.

While searching through the Halle Library database, I found this edited book. This book is a compilation of reviews and analyses of autobiographical comic pieces, created by various authors, which challenge the traditional notion of autobiographical. A review of Barry’s work is included in this compilation. [MAP]

Bibliography

Alpert, A. (2010). Overcome by photography: Camera lucida in an international frame. Third Text, 24(3), 331. doi:10.1080/09528821003799486

I found this text through a Halle Library E-Search. In this text, the author traces Barthes’s satori, coming from translation studies, the author offers a revision of Barthes’s theory of photography, namely that the photograph represents a surplus, not a direct equivalent.

Olin, M. (2002). Touching photographs: Roland Barthes’s ”mistaken” identification. Representations, 80(1), 99-118. doi:10.1525/rep.2002.80.1.99

I found this text through a Halle Library E-Search. In this text, the author argues that the significance of the photograph is not the relationship between the photograph and its referent, but between the photograph and its viewer or user, in the messy slippages of identification that happen in that interaction.

Sliwinski, S. (2004). A painful labour: Responsibility and photography. Visual Studies, 19(2), 150-162. doi:10.1080/1472586042000301656

I found this text through a Halle Library E-Search. In this text, the author argues that images of suffering create moments in which beholders realize their inability to respond, but that this limitation provides opportunity to question ethical relationships.

Starrett, G. (2003). Violence and the rhetoric of images. Cultural Anthropology, 18(3), 398-428. doi:10.1525/can.2003.18.3.398

I found this text through a Halle Library E-Search. In this text, the author engages in a discussion of Barthes’s Camera Lucida to argue that the mediation of social relationships that come from the first interaction of the photographer and the witnessed violence makes photography the coin of political communication.

Brown, E. H., Phu, T. (2014). Feeling photography. Durham: Duke University Press.

I found this text after following a rabbit-hole of looking at multiple sources’ bibliographies and then confirming that an Ebook version of the text is available through Halle Library. The collection takes on the material and affective response to photography through a variety of theoretical perspectives and through the analysis of multiple artists and photographic technologies.

 

Bibliography – 1/23

Gries, L. (2015). Still life with rhetoric: A new materialist approach for visual rhetorics. University Press of Colorado.

I found this book by using Google Scholar to search for works that cite Barthe’s Camera Lucida. In this book, Gries uses the Obama Hope image to study how images circulate and inspire others to create similar images or works within other genres. [HD]

Kress, G., & Van Leeuwen, T. (2006). Reading images: The grammar of visual design (2nd ed.). New York, NY: Routledge.

I found this book by using Google Scholar to search for works that cite Barthe’s Camera Lucida. The authors include a wide-range of discussions about visual communication, with examples of children’s drawings, school textbook illustrations, advertisements, scientific diagrams, and three-dimensional structures (sculptures, toys, architecture, etc.). Through these mediums, they examine how images communicate meaning. [HD]

Murray, J. (2010). Non-discursive rhetoric: Image and affect in multimodal composition. SUNY Press.

I found this book by using Google Scholar to search for works that cite Sontag’s On Photography. Murray draws from philosophy, rhetorical theory, and neuroscience to develop his own model of composing, which brings together writing, technology and the ways our minds process images. Within the book, he details ways writing teachers can help their students create multimodal texts. [HD]

Rettberg, J. W. (2014). Seeing ourselves through technology: How we use selfies, blogs and wearable devices to see and shape ourselves. United Kingdom: Palgrave Macmillan.

I found this book by using Google Scholar to search for works that cite Barthe’s Camera Lucida. The book was written by Jill Rettberg, a professor of Digital Culture at the University of Bergen in Norway. This open access book explores how we use technologies, selfies, blogs, and other devices to help us understand ourselves in a society where our machines sometimes rule who we are. [HD]

Rose, G. (2016). Visual methodologies: An introduction to researching with visual materials (4th ed.). SAGE.

I found this book by using Google Scholar to search for works that cite Barthe’s Camera Lucida. This is a bestselling guide about visual culture and analyzing and interpreting various forms of visual content. The fourth edition is up-to-date to include discussions of social media and new technologies. Other areas of interest within the book include a chapter about how to use the book, chapters on discourse analysis, and discussions about research methods. [HD]