Brooke Notes 4/3 – Mueller

Brooke Notes 4-3-17

Mueller, Derek. “Emplaced Disciplinary Networks from Middle Altitude.” Cross-border Networks in Writing Studies.

Text Citation

Mueller, Derek. “Emplaced Disciplinary Networks from Middle Altitude.” Cross-border Networks in Writing Studies. By Andre Williams, Louise Wetherbee Phelps, Jennifer Clary-Lemon, and Derek Mueller. Edmonton: Inkshed, 2017. 20-44.

Summary: 

This chapter is a portion of a larger study which collected the survey responses of 91 Canadian Writing studies scholars and began a systematic process of plotting scholarly activity physically (geographically) and figuratively, to map out a varied epistemological landscape.

Keywords: 

Essences, Differentiation, Shape-finding, Surveys, Disciplinary Networks, Canadian, American

Quotations:

“Question 10 asked about how participants regarded themselves, as a Canadian scholar, an American one, something in between, or something else. A close plurality of respondents selected Something in between (22; 40%) or Canadian (20; 36.6), with Something else (10; 18.8%) and American (2; 3.6%) receiving fewer selections. This indicates a mixed but balanced quality among the ways the respondents identify as emplaced scholars, and the tension elicited here shows up in other questions, too, which suggests a complex, transnational self-understanding among Canadian writing studies scholars” (Mueller, 27).

“The first three geography-oriented questions confirmed that over 70% of the respondents are from Canada, completed a BA or BS in Canada, an MA or MS in Canada, and live and work in Canada now. However, just 23 (41.8%) of the respondents completed a PhD in Canada; whereas 29 (52.7%) undertook doctoral studies in the United States. In an otherwise Canadian-oriented set of geographical identifiers, doctoral studies are the anomalous class, signaling cross-border activity through which a majority of Canadian writing studies scholars surveyed went to the United States for a PhD and returned to work in Canadian universities” (Mueller, 31).

“At another degree removed, we can begin to understand how the influences of Joy Ritchie, Kate Ronald, and Robert Brooke, professors at Nebraska who Dale Jacobs identified as mentors, are similarly implicated in and constitutive of this disciplinary network. Jacobs isn’t at Waterloo, and yet he is. He isn’t at Old Dominion, but he is. He isn’t at SUNY-Potsdam, Michigan State, Florida State, Wayne State, or Cincinnati, but he is. Digital cartography is useful for seeing the emerging definitional shape of this network—for grasping an image of Dale Jacobs as simultaneously emplaced and distributed” (Mueller, 43).

Questions:

Regarding the survey results of question 10 of the survey, in which 18.8% of survey respondants identified as “something else” when responding to the question “Do you see yourself primarily as a Canadian scholar, an American one, something in between, or something else?,” it makes me wonder if those who responded that way did so because they might have been an international student scholar of some kind who had taken part in the Canadian writing studies, and yet could not truly consider themselves a “Canadian” or “American” scholar due to their status in the country or the amount of time they had spent in the country up to that point.

I wonder if at one point there could be a small study that branches off of this one that endeavors to pick up this strand and see how international student scholars within Canadian writing studies have intersected with the field and how the field has intersected with their experience and background?

Further Reading:

Clary-Lemon, J. (2009). Shifting tradition: Writing research in Canada. American Review of Canadian Studies, 39(2), 94–111. doi:10.1080/02722010902848128

Fox, W. L. (2009). Aereality: On the world from above. Berkeley: Counterpoint.

Phelps, L. W., & Ackerman, J. M. (2010). Making the case for disciplinarity in rhetoric, composition, and writing studies: The visibility project. College Composition and Communication, 62(1), 180–215.

Soja, E. W. (2011). Postmodern geographies: The reassertion of space in critical social theory (2nd edition). London; New York: Verso.

Glossary 3/20

Perceptual Experience: Sousanis cites Alva Noe’s suggestion that perceptual experience is a way of encountering how thing are by making contact with how they appear to be (Sousanis, 73). Sousanis asserts that by being able to hold dual views of what something appears to be while recognizing other aspects of its appearance, we negotiate experience.

Derive: When speaking of how a person shifting the routes they take, rather than taking the same consistent path again and again, allows them to encounter different sights and make new connections, Sousanis mentions derive, which is a walk conceived of as a playful drifting rather than a goal-oriented journey (Susaanis, 112). Hence, shaking up our approaches and processes can help us avoid getting caught in a visual rut.

Bibliography 3/13/17 (Unflattening)

 

Vasudevan, L., & Rodriguez Kerr, K. (2016). “Unflattening” Our Ways of Seeing, Reading, and Writing. Journal of Adolescent & Adult Literacy60(1), 103-105.

Vasudevan and Rodriguez’s piece, which I found while using the Halle Library database to search for works that cited Nick Sousanis’ Unflattening, focuses on the messages of expanded ways of seeing in knowledge construction that are contained in the pages of Unflattening. They assert that Unflattening seeks to literally unflatten conceptions of meaning, reading, and writing through an active embrace of multimodality in its integration of images, design, and various genres of written text [RN-J].

Bahl, E. K. (2015). Comics and Scholarship: Sketching the Possibilities. Composition Studies43(1), 178.

Bahl’s piece, which I found while using the Halle Library database to search for works that cited Nick Sousanis’ Unflattening, suggests that fusions between comics and scholarship can (1) fruitfully challenge definitions of scholarly genres, offers resources for designing arguments in digital environments, and invites all who practice scholarly composing to reflect critically upon their mediating decisions [RN-J].

Causey, A. (2016). Drawn to See: Drawing as an Ethnographic Method. University of Toronto Press.

Causey’s piece, which I found while using google scholar to search for works that cited Nick Sousanis’ Unflattening, offers insights and practical techniques for social scientists interested in exploring drawing as a way of translating what they “see” during their research. Causey cites Sousanis’ method of using dots to communicate that the tops were spinning on page 16 of Unflattening [RN-J].

Lehman, Barbara. (2015). Visual Literacy and Education: Seeing the World Meets Critical Thinking. UCLA: Education 0249. Retrieved from: http://escholarship.org/uc/item/2r01b51g

Lehman’s piece, which I found while using google scholar to search for works that cited Nick Sousanis’ Unflattening, asserts that “seeing” needs to become an actively conscious activity rather than a passive one. She stresses the importance of critical visual literacy, and cites how Sousanis is expanding the understanding of the role of the visual in academia by bridging the worlds of academic study and popular visual culture [RN-J].                  

Pelaprat, E., & Cole, M. (2011). “Minding the gap”: imagination, creativity and human cognition. Integrative Psychological and Behavioral Science, 45(4), 397+. Retrieved from http://go.galegroup.com.ezproxy.emich.edu/ps/i.do?p=HRCA&sw=w&u=lom_emichu&v=2.1&it=r&id=GALE%7CA383176157&sid=summon&asid=e49bba25a3e945b6aec82e283fe3ba84

Pelaprat’s piece, which I found while using google scholar to search for works that Sousanis’ referenced in his bibliography for Unflattening, draws on the work of L.S. Vygotsky to develop a cultural-historical approach to the study of imagination as central to human cognitive processes, and argues that a cultural-historical approach to image formation is important for understanding how imagination and creativity are distinct, yet inter-penetrating processes [RN-J].

Reading Question 3/6 (Pine Point)

“Memory is funny. Specific and vague. Visceral and unreliable. Truth and fiction” (Simons).

“When you decide to get rid of a town, there are odd considerations and effects. For instance, once it’s gone, has it really, truly disappeared?” (Simons).

Despite the fact that the Pine Point town doesn’t really have much of a physical existence anymore in the space it once occupied, there is this collection of pictures, video clips, government documents that mention the closing of the town, and the collective (if selective) memories held of the town by each of the former residents. Given these remnants still exist even after the town itself is no more, it seems that there is a certain sense in which the town never truly disappeared entirely, but rather its story is merely forever paused.

However, Simons also touches on how the memories of the former Pine Point residents are incomplete in some aspects, and even selective in some instances. I am reminded of Barthes’ attempts to remember his mother as she was, and how despite his efforts, he only recognized her in fragments.

This brings me to the questions: When the collective memory of a town such as this is fragmented and piecemeal, has the town truly disappeared if it cannot be recalled in its entirety? What constitutes a “good enough” collection of memories for something to live on, in a sense? When the former residents themselves are no longer around, will the imagery left of the town be enough to give others an accurate glimpse of what was? Or does complete accuracy not matter so much for the visual memory as long as people are given glimpses of what this town was like?

Brooke Notes 2/27 (Graphesis pp 65-137)

Drucker, Johanna. Graphesis: Visual Forms of Knowledge Production.

Citation

Drucker, Johanna. Graphesis: Visual Forms of Knowledge Production. Harvard University Press, 2014, pp. 65-137.

Summary: 

Drucker discusses several aspects of graphical expressions, the history behind each aspect of them, and the ways in which they can be created to serve humanistic interpretation.

Citations:

Short, John Rennie. Making Space: Revisioning the World, 1475-1600. Syracuse (N.Y.): Syracuse UP, 2004. Print.

Brookes, Martin. Extreme Measures the Dark Visions and Bright Ideas of Francis Galton. London: Bloomsbury, 2004. Print.

Allwein, Gerard, and Jon Barwise. Logical Reasoning with Diagrams. Oxford: Oxford UP, 1996. Print.

Keywords: representations of information, knowledge generators, the rationalization of a surface, the distinction of figure and ground, the delimitation of the domain of visual elements so that they function as a relational system, timekeeping, temporality, Space-Making, spatiality, administration and record keeping, trees of knowledge/tree diagram, dynamic systems, humanistic methods, and visualizing interpretation.

Quotations:

  1. “A basic distinction can be made between visualizations that are representations of information already known and those that are knowledge generators capable of creating new information through their use” (Drucker 65).
  2. “A timeline, with its single, linear, homogeneous directional flow, expresses a model of temporality consistent with empirical sciences. But humanistic documents embody many alternative versions of temporality. Humanists deal with the representation of temporality of documents (when they were created), in documents (narrated, represented, depicted temporality), the construction of temporality across documents (the temporality of historical events), and also the shape of temporality that emerges from documentary evidence (the shape of an era, a season, a period, or epoch). They need a way to graph a chart temporality in an approach that suits the basic principles of interpretive knowledge” (Drucker 75).
  3. “Some visualization formats, such as tables, are so generalizable and re-purposable that their structure almost disappears from view. We take their operations for granted. This graphical organization and it spatial properties carry the trace of the purpose for which a graphic was created…Thus the static arrangement of information in a tabular form suggests that it has been modeled according to a strict distinction of content types and that these columns and divisions are neither mutable nor combinatoric” (Drucker 87).
  4. “Realist approaches depend above all upon an idea that phenomena are observer-independent and can be characterized as data…Rendering observation (the act of creating a statistical, empirical, or subjective account of an image) as if it were the same as the phenomena observed collapses the critical distance between the phenomenal world and its interpretation, undoing the concept of interpretation on which humanistic knowledge production is based” (Drucker 125).

Questions:

  1. Drucker states on page 71 that “the challenge is to break the literalism of representational strategies and engage with innovations in interpretive and inferential modes that augment human cognition.” Despite her break down of the principles of visualization, I still find myself asking the question “how do we do this?” When bringing these concepts into a classroom, can the concept of to go about this be broken down more simply?

Big Idea 2-13-17

“Seeing is of course very much a matter of verbalization. Unless I call my attention to what passes before my eyes, I simple won’t see it” (Dillard 8). “All I can do is try to…hush the noise of useless interior babble that keeps me from seeing just as surely as a newspaper dangled before my eyes” (Dillard 9).

Our ability to notice certain details can be hampered by how well we are able to name and describe something. Our expectations of how something should look can prevent us from “seeing” something that is outside of that norm. [RN-J]

Bibliography – 1/30

Brooks, K. (2009). More “seriously visible” reading: McCloud, McLuhan, and the visual language of the medium is the massage. College Composition and Communication, 61(1), W217-W237. Retrieved from http://ezproxy.emich.edu/login?url=http://search.proquest.com/docview/220709417?accountid=10650

Brook’s piece, which I found while using the Halle Library database to search for works that cited Diana George’s “From Analysis to Design: Visual Communication in the Teaching of Writing,” provides an analysis of Quentin Fiore’s visual-verbal text The Medium Is the Massage. Brook’s argues that the field of composition studies would benefit from more sustained and sophisticated readings of visual-verbal academic texts even as the field shifts from analysis to design. Brook’s names Diana George as one who helped outline the shift from analysis to design when it comes to teaching visual communication [RN-J].

Bunn, M. (2011). Visual Rhetoric in Composition Courses: Adopting an Approach that Helps Students Produce Their Own Visual Discourse. Reader: essays in reader-oriented theory, criticism, and pedagogy, (61), 87-103. Retrieved from http://literature.proquest.com.ezproxy.emich.edu/searchFulltext.do?id=R04649413&divLevel=0&trailId=1595202207A&area=criticism&forward=critref_ft&browse=true

Bunn’s piece, which I found while using the Halle Library database to search for works that cited Diana George’s “From Analysis to Design: Visual Communication in the Teaching of Writing,” addresses ways of teaching visual rhetoric in composition that deal with reception (something they “read”) rather than production (something they “write”). His article explores the concept of visual rhetoric in order to provide a sense of how visual rhetoric might be defined and taught in college composition courses to help students make important connections between the visual texts they are reading and their own efforts to produce visual texts [RN-J].

Lazaroff, R. (2008). Picturing composition: Snapshot photography and the writing classroom. Retrieved from http://ezproxy.emich.edu/login?url=http://search.proquest.com/docview/304671448?accountid=10650

Lazaroff’s Dissertation, which I found while using the Halle Library database to search for works that cited Diana George’s “From Analysis to Design: Visual Communication in the Teaching of Writing,” studied what happens when students in an English Composition course use their own photographs and picture-taking experiences to inform their own writing. He examines the creation of a student-centered classroom and the pedagogy that supports the assigning of projects in a composition class that combine students’ own photographs and picture-taking experiences [RN-J].

Marback, R. (2009). Embracing wicked problems: The turn to design in composition studies. College Composition and Communication, 61(2), 23. Retrieved from http://ezproxy.emich.edu/login url=http://search.proquest.com/docview/61819259?accountid=10650

Marback’s piece, which I found while using the Halle Library database to search for works that cited Diana George’s “From Analysis to Design: Visual Communication in the Teaching of Writing,” makes a case for the advantages of understanding of design as a matter of resolving wicked problems. He points to Diana George’s article as having begun the project of rearticulating composition studies around issues of student production as design [RN-J].

Odell, L., & Katz, S. M. (2009). “Yes, a T-shirt!”: Assessing visual composition in the “writing” class. College Composition and Communication, 61(1), 20. Retrieved from http://ezproxy.emich.edu/login?url=http://search.proquest.com/docview/61843250?accountid=10650

Odell and Katz’s piece, which I found while using the Halle Library database to search for works that cited Diana George’s “From Analysis to Design: Visual Communication in the Teaching of Writing,” explores how to assess student work with visuals without losing sight of conventional goals of a “writing” course. They illustrate this approach with an analysis of an unconventional student text-a T-shirt-that students submitted as the final assignment for a relatively conventional writing course [RN-J].

Stop Draw Prompt 1-23-17

Imagine someone took a picture of you at a random point during your everyday life. You are unaware in that moment that your picture will be taken, and so are not “posing” for the picture so much as you are immersed in whatever is going on.

For 3 minutes, draw what the camera would capture of you and whatever you are doing in that moment.

After the 3 minutes are up, each person can take turns describing what the random moment of themselves depicts.