Bibliography (4/2)

Wood, D. (2010). Rethinking the power of maps. Guilford Press.

I found this book by searching Google Scholar for texts citing The Power of Maps. The abstract I found listed this as a “contemporary follow-up” to Wood’s original publication, offering a “fresh look at what maps do, whose interests they serve, and how they can be used in surprising, creative, and radical ways” (Amazon Book Review). This book was cited 377 times. [JS]

Crampton, J. W. (2001). Maps as social constructions: power, communication and visualization. Progress in Human Geography25(2), 235-252.

I found this article by searching Google Scholar for texts citing The Power of Maps. This seems to be an extension of Wood’s ideas and focuses on how maps can be problematic communication devices. The two major developments this article brings forward are “1) investigations of maps as practices of power-knowledge; and 2) ‘geographic visualization’ (GVis) which uses the map’s power to explore, analyze and visualize spatial datasets to understand patterns better” (Article Abstract). This article was cited 368 times. [JS]

Kitchin, R., & Dodge, M. (2007). Rethinking maps. Progress in human geography31(3), 331-344.

I found this article by searching Google Scholar for texts citing The Power of Maps. This article narrows the focus of Crampton’s article, claiming that cartography is “profitably conceived as a processual, rather than representational, science” (Article Abstract). The piece asks about map security ontologically – and argues that there is no secure ontological status. This article was cited 370 times. [JS]

Harris, L. M., & Hazen, H. D. (2005). Power of maps:(Counter) mapping for conservation. ACME: An International Journal for Critical Geographies4(1), 99-130.

I found this article by searching Google Scholar for texts citing The Power of Maps. This article looks at how defining and mapping geologically protected areas for conservation links to “themes from political ecology, social natures, and conservation biology literatures to extend our understanding of maps as reflective of, and productive of, power” (Article Abstract). This article was cited 116 times. [JS]

Wood, D. (1993). The Fine Line Between Mapping and Map Making. Cartographica: The International Journal for Geographic Information and Geovisualization30(4), 50-60.

I found this article by searching Google Scholar for texts citing The Power of Maps. Written by Wood, this article is responding to “Brian Harley’s efforts to re-form the history and theory of cartography” (Article Abstract). Wood argues that Harley was erroneously “dazzled” and “inspired” by Continental thinkers but failed to effectively argue for “cartography embodying the self-conscious awareness only an honest, living history could provide.” This article was cited 58 times. [JS]