Bibliography 3/13/17 (Unflattening)

 

Vasudevan, L., & Rodriguez Kerr, K. (2016). “Unflattening” Our Ways of Seeing, Reading, and Writing. Journal of Adolescent & Adult Literacy60(1), 103-105.

Vasudevan and Rodriguez’s piece, which I found while using the Halle Library database to search for works that cited Nick Sousanis’ Unflattening, focuses on the messages of expanded ways of seeing in knowledge construction that are contained in the pages of Unflattening. They assert that Unflattening seeks to literally unflatten conceptions of meaning, reading, and writing through an active embrace of multimodality in its integration of images, design, and various genres of written text [RN-J].

Bahl, E. K. (2015). Comics and Scholarship: Sketching the Possibilities. Composition Studies43(1), 178.

Bahl’s piece, which I found while using the Halle Library database to search for works that cited Nick Sousanis’ Unflattening, suggests that fusions between comics and scholarship can (1) fruitfully challenge definitions of scholarly genres, offers resources for designing arguments in digital environments, and invites all who practice scholarly composing to reflect critically upon their mediating decisions [RN-J].

Causey, A. (2016). Drawn to See: Drawing as an Ethnographic Method. University of Toronto Press.

Causey’s piece, which I found while using google scholar to search for works that cited Nick Sousanis’ Unflattening, offers insights and practical techniques for social scientists interested in exploring drawing as a way of translating what they “see” during their research. Causey cites Sousanis’ method of using dots to communicate that the tops were spinning on page 16 of Unflattening [RN-J].

Lehman, Barbara. (2015). Visual Literacy and Education: Seeing the World Meets Critical Thinking. UCLA: Education 0249. Retrieved from: http://escholarship.org/uc/item/2r01b51g

Lehman’s piece, which I found while using google scholar to search for works that cited Nick Sousanis’ Unflattening, asserts that “seeing” needs to become an actively conscious activity rather than a passive one. She stresses the importance of critical visual literacy, and cites how Sousanis is expanding the understanding of the role of the visual in academia by bridging the worlds of academic study and popular visual culture [RN-J].                  

Pelaprat, E., & Cole, M. (2011). “Minding the gap”: imagination, creativity and human cognition. Integrative Psychological and Behavioral Science, 45(4), 397+. Retrieved from http://go.galegroup.com.ezproxy.emich.edu/ps/i.do?p=HRCA&sw=w&u=lom_emichu&v=2.1&it=r&id=GALE%7CA383176157&sid=summon&asid=e49bba25a3e945b6aec82e283fe3ba84

Pelaprat’s piece, which I found while using google scholar to search for works that Sousanis’ referenced in his bibliography for Unflattening, draws on the work of L.S. Vygotsky to develop a cultural-historical approach to the study of imagination as central to human cognitive processes, and argues that a cultural-historical approach to image formation is important for understanding how imagination and creativity are distinct, yet inter-penetrating processes [RN-J].

3 Comments

  1. I find it interesting that of the several sources you found, one was in the field of cognitive psychology. Thinking about disciplinarity, I wonder how the text was received outside of the humanities. What was the uptake like in fields such as psychology? What does this say about the way the humanities and the sciences view images and visuals? Why would the reception for Unflattening be different (if it is in fact different) than the reception of a text like Linda Barry’s?

  2. I found this entry: Vasudevan, L., & Rodriguez Kerr, K. (2016). “Unflattening” Our Ways of Seeing, Reading, and Writing. Journal of Adolescent & Adult Literacy, 60(1), 103-105.
    interesting as Sousanis on page 45 is trying to teach “Ecosystem” by visual tools/drawing which is very interesting and understandable compare to just reading the texts.

  3. I like the assembling of cross-disciplinary works here; it could be a kind of Unflattening in its own. The pieces here also seem to emphasize comics and their relationship to scholarship and visual literacy. I wonder if these texts hold McCloud in them as well as Sousanis.

    I’m especially interested in the Drawn to See text here. I’ve wondered about methodological implications of Sousanis’s work and to spend some time reading an attempt at such would be informative.

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