Bibliography – 1/30

Brooks, K. (2009). More “seriously visible” reading: McCloud, McLuhan, and the visual language of the medium is the massage. College Composition and Communication, 61(1), W217-W237. Retrieved from http://ezproxy.emich.edu/login?url=http://search.proquest.com/docview/220709417?accountid=10650

Brook’s piece, which I found while using the Halle Library database to search for works that cited Diana George’s “From Analysis to Design: Visual Communication in the Teaching of Writing,” provides an analysis of Quentin Fiore’s visual-verbal text The Medium Is the Massage. Brook’s argues that the field of composition studies would benefit from more sustained and sophisticated readings of visual-verbal academic texts even as the field shifts from analysis to design. Brook’s names Diana George as one who helped outline the shift from analysis to design when it comes to teaching visual communication [RN-J].

Bunn, M. (2011). Visual Rhetoric in Composition Courses: Adopting an Approach that Helps Students Produce Their Own Visual Discourse. Reader: essays in reader-oriented theory, criticism, and pedagogy, (61), 87-103. Retrieved from http://literature.proquest.com.ezproxy.emich.edu/searchFulltext.do?id=R04649413&divLevel=0&trailId=1595202207A&area=criticism&forward=critref_ft&browse=true

Bunn’s piece, which I found while using the Halle Library database to search for works that cited Diana George’s “From Analysis to Design: Visual Communication in the Teaching of Writing,” addresses ways of teaching visual rhetoric in composition that deal with reception (something they “read”) rather than production (something they “write”). His article explores the concept of visual rhetoric in order to provide a sense of how visual rhetoric might be defined and taught in college composition courses to help students make important connections between the visual texts they are reading and their own efforts to produce visual texts [RN-J].

Lazaroff, R. (2008). Picturing composition: Snapshot photography and the writing classroom. Retrieved from http://ezproxy.emich.edu/login?url=http://search.proquest.com/docview/304671448?accountid=10650

Lazaroff’s Dissertation, which I found while using the Halle Library database to search for works that cited Diana George’s “From Analysis to Design: Visual Communication in the Teaching of Writing,” studied what happens when students in an English Composition course use their own photographs and picture-taking experiences to inform their own writing. He examines the creation of a student-centered classroom and the pedagogy that supports the assigning of projects in a composition class that combine students’ own photographs and picture-taking experiences [RN-J].

Marback, R. (2009). Embracing wicked problems: The turn to design in composition studies. College Composition and Communication, 61(2), 23. Retrieved from http://ezproxy.emich.edu/login url=http://search.proquest.com/docview/61819259?accountid=10650

Marback’s piece, which I found while using the Halle Library database to search for works that cited Diana George’s “From Analysis to Design: Visual Communication in the Teaching of Writing,” makes a case for the advantages of understanding of design as a matter of resolving wicked problems. He points to Diana George’s article as having begun the project of rearticulating composition studies around issues of student production as design [RN-J].

Odell, L., & Katz, S. M. (2009). “Yes, a T-shirt!”: Assessing visual composition in the “writing” class. College Composition and Communication, 61(1), 20. Retrieved from http://ezproxy.emich.edu/login?url=http://search.proquest.com/docview/61843250?accountid=10650

Odell and Katz’s piece, which I found while using the Halle Library database to search for works that cited Diana George’s “From Analysis to Design: Visual Communication in the Teaching of Writing,” explores how to assess student work with visuals without losing sight of conventional goals of a “writing” course. They illustrate this approach with an analysis of an unconventional student text-a T-shirt-that students submitted as the final assignment for a relatively conventional writing course [RN-J].