Bibliography

Alpert, A. (2010). Overcome by photography: Camera lucida in an international frame. Third Text, 24(3), 331. doi:10.1080/09528821003799486

I found this text through a Halle Library E-Search. In this text, the author traces Barthes’s satori, coming from translation studies, the author offers a revision of Barthes’s theory of photography, namely that the photograph represents a surplus, not a direct equivalent.

Olin, M. (2002). Touching photographs: Roland Barthes’s ”mistaken” identification. Representations, 80(1), 99-118. doi:10.1525/rep.2002.80.1.99

I found this text through a Halle Library E-Search. In this text, the author argues that the significance of the photograph is not the relationship between the photograph and its referent, but between the photograph and its viewer or user, in the messy slippages of identification that happen in that interaction.

Sliwinski, S. (2004). A painful labour: Responsibility and photography. Visual Studies, 19(2), 150-162. doi:10.1080/1472586042000301656

I found this text through a Halle Library E-Search. In this text, the author argues that images of suffering create moments in which beholders realize their inability to respond, but that this limitation provides opportunity to question ethical relationships.

Starrett, G. (2003). Violence and the rhetoric of images. Cultural Anthropology, 18(3), 398-428. doi:10.1525/can.2003.18.3.398

I found this text through a Halle Library E-Search. In this text, the author engages in a discussion of Barthes’s Camera Lucida to argue that the mediation of social relationships that come from the first interaction of the photographer and the witnessed violence makes photography the coin of political communication.

Brown, E. H., Phu, T. (2014). Feeling photography. Durham: Duke University Press.

I found this text after following a rabbit-hole of looking at multiple sources’ bibliographies and then confirming that an Ebook version of the text is available through Halle Library. The collection takes on the material and affective response to photography through a variety of theoretical perspectives and through the analysis of multiple artists and photographic technologies.