Potential resource for posters – color scheme tool

Hi everyone,

I stumbled upon this website called Colourlovers the other day, and I’ve found it really helpful in helping me think about potential color palettes/schemes for my poster. As someone who isn’t too versed in color theory (yet), I found it helpful to browse the variety of color schemes that are shared on this site, which are also conveniently sorted into  “channels” based on purpose (web, print, etc.).  Also, the schemes lay out the number/code for each color used, which makes it easy to replicate the colors in whichever software you’re using.

Wanted to share the resource in case anyone else was interested!

Bibliography Entries – 2/6

Kress, G. (2005). Gains and losses: New forms of texts, knowledge, and learning. Computers and Composition, 22(1), 5-22. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.compcom.2004.12.004

This source, which is the primary text that Wysocki is responding to, is accessible through Google Scholar. Kress explores what can be gained (affordances) and lost when we shift communicative representation away from writing, and toward materiality, images, digital media, and other non-traditional forms of communication. He also discusses how these shifts toward design can impact learning, forms of reading, knowledge, and human agency. [NW]

 

Saenger, P. (1997). Space between words: The origins of silent reading. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press.

This book, which Wysocki references in her discussion of space, is accessible through Google Books. Saenger documents the history and process of how reading–which was originally an oral activity–has become a silent activity due to writing and the written space between words. The space on pages (which makes reading a silent activity) originates from and continues to shape how we comprehend words and reading. [NW]

 

New London Group. (1996). A pedagogy of multiliteracies: Designing social futures. Harvard Educational Review, 66(1), 60-92. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.17763/haer.66.1.17370n67v22j160u

This article, which I’ve heard framed as a foundational text for multimodality (and has been cited in several of our readings already), is accessible through Google Scholar. The New London Group argue that we need a broader understanding of literacy–one that encompasses the multiple communication channels students use daily. They argue that embracing a multiliteracy / multimodal pedagogy can empower students to design and shape their social futures.  [NW]

 

Ball, C. (2012). Assessing scholarly multimedia: A rhetorical genre studies approach. Technical Communication Quarterly, 21(1), 61-77. Doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10572252.2012.626390

Per our conversation about assessing visual texts, this article, which is accessible through Cheryl Ball’s website, might be helpful. Ball outlines what scholarly multimedia texts are–what they look like–and recommends that teachers invite their students to help generate assessment criteria with which their work can be assessed. She also argues that when assessing multimedia work, the content and form cannot be separated from the text’s rhetorical purpose. [NW]

 

Norman, D. Affordances and design. Retrieved from http://www.jnd.org/dn.mss/affordances_and.html

This source, which was listed in Wysocki’s works cited page, explores Norman’s concept of affordance. He explains that the term affordance has gained traction with design work, but the concept of perceived affordance raises important questions about physical and cultural constraints. Norman also argues that we can be well served by thinking about affordances relationships between various design elements/stakeholders. [NW]

Stop Write – 1/30

We seem to live in a world where math, science, and “practical” knowledge are valued, and the humanities–the arts–are not. Yet, Barry talks about art, and the arts more broadly, as an essence that lives and transcends. Consider the following passage from Syllabus:

“There is something common to everything we call the arts… This ancient ‘it’ is something I call ‘an image.’ By image I don’t mean a visual representation, I mean something that is more like a ghost than a picture; something which feels somehow alive, has no fixed meaning and is contained and transported by something that is not alive- a book, a song, a painting–anything we call an ‘art form’” (15).

In the time remaining, respond to at least one of the questions below:

  • What does Barry’s explanation mean to you?
  • How might you differently describe the “it” that is present in the arts/humanities?
  • What do Barry’s and/or your explanation say about how we ought to value the arts/humanities?
  • Can you name and describe an example of Barry’s ‘image’ concept that is representative of her (or your) description?
  • How is Barry’s understanding of ‘an image’ similar to or different from an idea?

Big Ideas Entry 1/30/17

How does an image move or transfer (Barry 9), not only in geographical locations but from our mind and thoughts? How are our hands, images, and insight collected and made apparent through some display of visual representation? These are some of the very questions Lynda Barry seeks to answer, expanding reader’s idea of visual representation to more than an image drawn or painted, but also to a book, song, or object we interact with (15). One of the ways to answer these questions is by using a composition notebook. Collecting elements from our everyday lives and using these as entry points can create unexpected juxtapositions that form stories and show different patterns that Barry believes will help discover “what this thing I call ‘the back of the mind” is up to (62). When this is achieved, understanding movement and transfer of the visual from within becomes more apparent. [JW]

Reading Question

“This ancient ‘it’ is something I call ‘an image.’ By image I don’t mean a visual representation, I mean something that is more like a ghost than a picture; something which feels somehow alive, has no fixed meaning and is contained and transported by something that is not alive- a book, a son, a painting–anything we call an ‘art form’” (15).

–Lynda Barry, Syllabus

 

Barthes writes in Camera Lucida that punctum makes a photo more than a visual representation. In this passage, Barry seems to be referring to a similar phenomenon, but with an image. Since the referent of a drawing is not the same as the referent of a photograph, how would you describe its transference? What makes an image an image, and not merely a visual representation?

Brooke Notes-George

George, Diana. “From Analysis to Design: Visual Communication in the Teaching of Writing.” College Composition and Communication, vol. 54, no. 1, Sept. 2002, pp. 11–39.

Summary: “In an attempt to bring composition studies into a more thoroughgoing discussion of the place of visual literacy in the writing classroom, I argue that throughout the history of writing instruction in this country the terms of debate typical in discussions of visual literacy and the teaching of writing have limited the kinds of assignments we might imagine for composition.” (George 11)

As George states in her abstract, she explains how visual literacy has been viewed throughout compositions studies’ history. She begins in the 1940s post-World War II with Dick and Jane books recognizing that pictures need to be “read,” moves into the 1950s and ’60s recognizing that television also has images that need to be interpreted, and into the 1980s where students need to be the producers of images and not just the consumers.

NCTE’s primary author on the committee, Neil Postman, made a call for teaching films in the English classroom in 1961 and for assisting students in acquiring “taste and critical judgement” as a “literary experience” through films (17). In 1986, Costanzo wrote a report for NCTE that explained how film and writing are “equal partners” (24).

Classrooms did not foster visual literacy in textbooks or in assignments like George portrays in her 2002 article. She highlights textbooks from the 1950s-1970s that engage writers with pictures in a superficial way, in using it as a prompt or for analysis, but not for composition. In contrast, George assigns a visual argument assignment and is excited by the arguments her first year writing students compose.

Citations:

Bartholomae, David, and Anthony Petrosky. Ways of Reading. Boston, MA, St. Martin’s Press, 1987.

George, Diana, and Diane Shoos. “Dropping Breadcrumbs in the Intertextual Forest: or, We Should Have Brought a Compass.” Passions, Pedagogies, and Twentieth-First Century Technologies, Edited by Gail Hawisher and Cynthia Selfe, Utah State UP, Logan, UT, 1999, pp. 115–126.

Quotations:

  • “My guess is that many of these difficulties will not ease up in yet another age of back-to-basics talk and threats of outcomes-based funding. Yet, our students will continue to work with whatever technology–much of it primarily visual–they can get their hands on” (George 32).
  • “Literacy means more than words, and visual literacy means more than play” (16).
  • “What was radical about Berger’s work was his insistence on breaking down the barriers that separated high culture (in this case art history) from low (advertising)[…] In this textbook, not only was meaning no longer restricted to the verbal, the visual was also not used as a gentle step into the ‘more serious’ world of the verbal” (George 23).

Questions:

  • George explains the influence of design, making an example out of the formatting of a research paper. How can one break the idea of “academic decorum” with research papers and make it mainstream?
  • What are the three R’s she references from Rudolph Flesch?

Big Ideas (1/30)

Images, layout, or graphics communicate meaning by constructing visual arguments, making claims through particular use of comparison, juxtaposition, and intertextuality (George, 29). Images are a means of visual representation of the world rather than replication of a permanent reality. In the case of drawing, there is the image you are attempting to create – and there is the actual image as it is drawn (Barry, 16). [JS]

Bibliography – 1/30

Brooks, K. (2009). More “seriously visible” reading: McCloud, McLuhan, and the visual language of the medium is the massage. College Composition and Communication, 61(1), W217-W237. Retrieved from http://ezproxy.emich.edu/login?url=http://search.proquest.com/docview/220709417?accountid=10650

Brook’s piece, which I found while using the Halle Library database to search for works that cited Diana George’s “From Analysis to Design: Visual Communication in the Teaching of Writing,” provides an analysis of Quentin Fiore’s visual-verbal text The Medium Is the Massage. Brook’s argues that the field of composition studies would benefit from more sustained and sophisticated readings of visual-verbal academic texts even as the field shifts from analysis to design. Brook’s names Diana George as one who helped outline the shift from analysis to design when it comes to teaching visual communication [RN-J].

Bunn, M. (2011). Visual Rhetoric in Composition Courses: Adopting an Approach that Helps Students Produce Their Own Visual Discourse. Reader: essays in reader-oriented theory, criticism, and pedagogy, (61), 87-103. Retrieved from http://literature.proquest.com.ezproxy.emich.edu/searchFulltext.do?id=R04649413&divLevel=0&trailId=1595202207A&area=criticism&forward=critref_ft&browse=true

Bunn’s piece, which I found while using the Halle Library database to search for works that cited Diana George’s “From Analysis to Design: Visual Communication in the Teaching of Writing,” addresses ways of teaching visual rhetoric in composition that deal with reception (something they “read”) rather than production (something they “write”). His article explores the concept of visual rhetoric in order to provide a sense of how visual rhetoric might be defined and taught in college composition courses to help students make important connections between the visual texts they are reading and their own efforts to produce visual texts [RN-J].

Lazaroff, R. (2008). Picturing composition: Snapshot photography and the writing classroom. Retrieved from http://ezproxy.emich.edu/login?url=http://search.proquest.com/docview/304671448?accountid=10650

Lazaroff’s Dissertation, which I found while using the Halle Library database to search for works that cited Diana George’s “From Analysis to Design: Visual Communication in the Teaching of Writing,” studied what happens when students in an English Composition course use their own photographs and picture-taking experiences to inform their own writing. He examines the creation of a student-centered classroom and the pedagogy that supports the assigning of projects in a composition class that combine students’ own photographs and picture-taking experiences [RN-J].

Marback, R. (2009). Embracing wicked problems: The turn to design in composition studies. College Composition and Communication, 61(2), 23. Retrieved from http://ezproxy.emich.edu/login url=http://search.proquest.com/docview/61819259?accountid=10650

Marback’s piece, which I found while using the Halle Library database to search for works that cited Diana George’s “From Analysis to Design: Visual Communication in the Teaching of Writing,” makes a case for the advantages of understanding of design as a matter of resolving wicked problems. He points to Diana George’s article as having begun the project of rearticulating composition studies around issues of student production as design [RN-J].

Odell, L., & Katz, S. M. (2009). “Yes, a T-shirt!”: Assessing visual composition in the “writing” class. College Composition and Communication, 61(1), 20. Retrieved from http://ezproxy.emich.edu/login?url=http://search.proquest.com/docview/61843250?accountid=10650

Odell and Katz’s piece, which I found while using the Halle Library database to search for works that cited Diana George’s “From Analysis to Design: Visual Communication in the Teaching of Writing,” explores how to assess student work with visuals without losing sight of conventional goals of a “writing” course. They illustrate this approach with an analysis of an unconventional student text-a T-shirt-that students submitted as the final assignment for a relatively conventional writing course [RN-J].